HydroGeoSphere Language Grammar

Syntax highlighting is now available for Grok input files! Dr. Claus Haslauer from the University of Tübingen created the syntax highlighting functionality. Claus' highlighting functionality works on both TextMate and SublimeText editors (OSX and Windows machines) and the features include:

  • "Skip on" and "Skip off" is greyed out.
  • "Problem description" at the beginning is greyed out.
  • "!" are greyed out (as comments).
  • Input files are coloured.
  • Numbers are highlighted.
  • Domain names (porous medium, surface, etc.) are highlighted.
  • Keywords ('end', 'clear', 'choose') are highlighted.

To find out more information on the Syntax Highlighting please visit Claus' github page.

Job Notice - Intermediate Numerical Modeller (Hydrogeology/Hydrology)

Aquanty is looking for a intermediate Numerical Modeller to join our growing team in Waterloo, ON. The ideal candidate has a background in hydrogeology and numerical modelling at the regional scale.

Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada

Education: Bachelors or Masters level degree in hydrogeology or related field

Experience: 2 - 10 years

Position Description:

The successful applicant will support the Aquanty team with the construction of basin scale numerical models. Tasks are expected to include: data processing, GIS, hydrostratigraphic interpretation, 3D model construction, numerical model setup and simulation.

Desired Skill Set:

·         Experience building numerical models for hydrogeology/hydrology applications

·         Experience interpreting regional scale hydrostratigraphy

·         Strong GIS and data processing skills

·         Experience with HydroGeoSphere/FEFLOW/MODFLOW is an asset

·         Ability to work in a team

 

Please send your resume to hr@aquanty.com

About Aquanty

Aquanty Inc., is a research spin-off company from the University of Waterloo specializing in computer simulations of how water moves through the natural environment. Our best-in-class simulation platform, HydroGeoSphere, is used in a number of industries including; agriculture, oil and gas, mining, watershed management, contaminant remediation, and nuclear storage and disposal to support water related decision making. Check out our Case Studies to see examples.

HGS User Conference - Registration Deadline January 22, 2017

4th International Hydrogeosphere User Conference

Tackling problems of water quantity and quality increasingly requires the simulation and quantification of complex flow and transport processes in coupled surface-subsurface systems. Over the last 15 years a range of numerical codes such as Hydrogeosphere (HGS)OpenGeosys (OGS)Parflow and others have become available to address those types of problems. Building upon a series of previous HGS user conferences in Liège, Hannover and Neuchatel, the fourth conference in this series will be held at the University of Bayreuth, Germany from the 6th – 10th of March 2017. The conference is entitled “Hydrogeosphere & More: Fully Integrated Simulation of Coupled Surface/Subsurface Flow and Transport Processes” and focuses on the latest research and developments in fully integrated simulation of hydrosystems from the HGS user community and beyond.

Click here for conference registration. 

HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - Incorporating Surface Water Operations in an Integrated Hydrologic Model: Model Development and Application to the Lower Republican River Basin, United States

AUTHORS: A. Brookfield, C. Gnau, and B. Wilson

Few river systems remain unaltered by engineered water management structures. Yet research investigating the interdependence between natural and engineered components of a hydrologic system within a modeling framework is limited. Most current models either focus on the natural system, incorporating only a portion of the engineered structures and often excluding elements like reservoir operations, or focus on the engineered system, simplifying the temporal and spatial variations of the surface water/groundwater flow system. The objective of this work is to link an object-oriented model of surface water operations to a physically based, fully integrated surface/ subsurface hydrologic model to capture the effects of water management decisions on the groundwater and surface water flow systems. The capabilities of the new linked modeling framework are demonstrated in the heavily managed Lower Republican River Basin (LRRB) in portions of Nebraska and Kansas in the central United States. This area of the basin contains two storage reservoirs and a network of surface water canals from seven irrigation districts, in addition to thousands of diversions from groundwater and surface water irrigators. The linked model was able to reasonably represent the surface and groundwater flow conditions and demonstrated the interdependence between the surface water operations and the groundwater/surface water flow system. The temporal variability of groundwater/surface water interactions has a significant impact on reservoir operations and streamflow. This work demonstrated how integrating surface water operations and groundwater/surface water flow components into a model improves the representativeness of the simulated results and better captures the temporal and spatial variations in hydrologic processes occurring within the domain.

 
OASIS lower Republican River model schematic

OASIS lower Republican River model schematic

 

HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - Combined analysis of time-varying sensitivity and identifiability indices to diagnose the response of a complex environmental model

AUTHORS:  Mehdi Ghasemizade, Gabriele Baroni, Karim Abbaspour, and Mario Schirmer

Physically based models for simulating environmental processes are usually criticized due to having many parameters. This issue leads to over-parameterization and can finally reduce the uncertainty (reliability) of the simulated outputs. Sensitivity and identifiability analyses are common diagnostic tools to address over-parametrization in complex environmental models. In this study, we performed a temporal global sensitivity and identifiability analyses of HydroGeoSphere (HGS) model parameters. HGS was used to simulate daily evapotranspiration, water content, and recharge based on high quality data of a weighing lysimeter. Figure below shows the schematic of the lysimeter as well as the conceptual model for simulating the lysimeter. The model has four soil layers in addition to a preferential flow component. We found that identifiability of a parameter does not necessarily reduce output uncertainty. It was also found that the sensitivity of the model parameters is required to allow uncertainty reduction in the model output. 

Schematic of the weighing lysimeter.

Schematic of the weighing lysimeter.

Conceptual Model.

Conceptual Model.

HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - On the effects of preferential or barrier flow features on solute plumes in permeable porous media

Authors: Megan Sebbena and Adrian Werner

Discrete flow features (DFFs) such as fractures, faults, sand lenses and clay layers are common geologic features in groundwater systems. DFFs can provide preferential pathways (i.e. ‘preferential flow features’; PFFs) or act as barriers (i.e. ‘barrier flow features’, BFFs) to fluid flow and solute transport. Considerably less research attention has been paid to the role of DFFs in modifying groundwater flow and solute transport where the host rock is permeable, compared to low-permeability rocks. A numerical investigation was conducted within this study to explore how the distributions of solute plumes in permeable aquifers are influenced by a DFF.

HydroGeoSphere was used to evaluate the impact of 2D flow effects within DFFs, which were treated as thin bands of porous media. We show the changes to solute plumes that occur where both BFFs and PFFs are encountered in otherwise permeable rock aquifers (e.g. sandstone and limestone). Additionally, the potential role of ‘back dispersion’ (i.e. the anomalous movement of solutes from the PFF back into the matrix against the direction of groundwater flow) on predictions of PFF effects are explored. The numerical simulations were used to quantify the displacement and widening (or narrowing) of a steady-state solute plume as it crosses a DFF in idealised, 1 × 1 m aquifers. A simple analytical expression for the advective displacement of a solute plume encountering a DFF is provided.

The outcomes of this study suggest that PFFs typically have a more significant influence on plume distributions than BFFs, and the impact of DFFs on solute plumes generally increases with increasing aperture. Plumes crossing a PFF are less symmetrical, and peak solute concentrations beneath PFFs are considerably lower than plumes in BFF cases.

Steady-state salinity distributions for PFF Cases A, B and C (decreasing variability between the PFF and matrix hydraulic conductivities), and Scenarios 1, 2, 3 and 4 (increasing PFF aperture). PFFs are indicated by transparent white lines.

Steady-state salinity distributions for PFF Cases A, B and C (decreasing variability between the PFF and matrix hydraulic conductivities), and Scenarios 1, 2, 3 and 4 (increasing PFF aperture). PFFs are indicated by transparent white lines.

Steady-state salinity distributions for BFF Cases D, E and F (increasing variability between the BFF and matrix hydraulic conductivities), and Scenarios 1, 2, 3 and 4 (increasing BFF aperture). BFFs are indicated by transparent white lines.

Steady-state salinity distributions for BFF Cases D, E and F (increasing variability between the BFF and matrix hydraulic conductivities), and Scenarios 1, 2, 3 and 4 (increasing BFF aperture). BFFs are indicated by transparent white lines.

HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - American Geophysical Union 2016 Fall Meeting

The AGU 2016 Fall meeting starts January 12, and we have three presentations that implement the HGS model. Swing by these talks to see some great research from our HGS users. 

H43E-1503: Application of a 3D Model to Assess the Thermo-Hydrological Effects of Climate Warming in a Discontinuous Permafrost Zone, Umiujaq, Northern Quebec, Canada

Authors: Masoumeh Parhizkar, Rene Therrien, John W H Molson, Jean-Michel Lemieux, Richard Fortier, Marie-Catherine Talbot Poulin, Pierre Therrien, and Michel Ouellet

H34B-06: Comparing Models and Methods for the Delineation of Stream Baseflow Contribution Areas

Authors: Reynold Chow, Michael Frind, Emil O Frind, Jon P Jones, Marcelo Sousa, David L Rudolph, and Wolfgang Nowak

H52B-02: Fully Integrated Atmospheric, Surface, and Subsurface Model of the California Basin

Authors: Jason H Davison, Hyoun-Tae Hwang, Edward A Sudicky, Derek V. Mallia, and John C Lin

    HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - Coupled surface and subsurface flow modeling of natural hillslopes in the Aburrá Valley (Medellín, Colombia)

    AUTHORS:  Daniela Blessent, Janet Barco, André Guy Tranquille Temgoua, and Oscar Echeverri Ramirez.

    HydroGeoSphere was used to conduct numerical simulations of coupled surface-subsurface water flow of a natural hillslope that is currently monitored because of soil instability problems. It is located in the Pajarito locality, northwest of the Medellín municipality (Colombia). Observed rainfall data (events that occurred between October and December 2014), soil water retention curve determined in the laboratory, and geological information taken from previous studies are considered to build the model. Specific objectives are to analyze the impact of rainfall temporal distribution, mesh resolution, coupling length, physical processes (subsurface flow, surface flow, and evapotranspiration), and soil heterogeneity, on pore-water pressure and infiltration. These aspects are important in the region of study, which is highly affected by soil movements, especially during the high rain seasons that occur twice a year.

    Simulation results show that rainfall temporal variability, mesh resolution, coupling length, and the conceptual model chosen to represent the heterogeneous soil, have a noticeable influence on results, particularly for high rainfall intensities. Moreover, results indicate that surface-subsurface coupled modeling is required to avoid unrealistic increase in hydraulic heads when high rainfall intensities cause top-down saturation of soil. This work is a first effort towards fostering hydrogeological modeling expertise that may support the development of monitoring systems and early landslide warning in a country where the rainy season is often the cause of hydrogeological tragedies associated with landslides, mud flow or debris flow.

    Modeled natural hillslope: stochastic equivalent porous medium facies in the heterogeneous upper layer (silt and rock blocks) and homogeneous porous medium in the lower layer (saprolite)

    Modeled natural hillslope: stochastic equivalent porous medium facies in the heterogeneous upper layer (silt and rock blocks) and homogeneous porous medium in the lower layer (saprolite)

    Difference in simulated pore-water pressure considering coupled surface-subsurface water flow and only subsurface water flow at the observation point, located 40 cm deep

    Difference in simulated pore-water pressure considering coupled surface-subsurface water flow and only subsurface water flow at the observation point, located 40 cm deep

    HGS RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT - Characterizing the climate-driven collapses and expansions of wetland habitat networks with HydroGeoSphere

    AUTHORS:  Ganming Liu, Franklin W. Schwartz, Christopher K. Wright, and Nancy E. McIntyre

    The use of HydroGeoSphere (HGS) in assessing wetland habitat connectivity in this study presents a new direction in the application of such a sophisticated hydrologic model. The following paragraphs describe the background/motivation, some of the results, and implication of the study.

    Habitat connectivity is a landscape attribute critical to preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It describes the ability of species to disperse or move between patches of suitable habitat. For wetland-dependent species, movements between wetlands involve a range of spatial scales, and involve activities such as foraging within wetland complexes, dispersal to newly available habitat during deluge, and migration to drought refugia during dry times. Such movements are critical to long-term persistence and will influence species range adjustments to climatic shifts.

    There has been a recent emphasis on new strategies for describing and evaluating the quality of wetland habitat connectivity for wildlife. One of the most compelling approaches involves the application of graph theory to establish links between climatic drivers and habitat connectivity. The graph-theoretical approach treats wetlands as nodes to map habitat connectivity and to define habitat networks (figure below) for ecological analysis.

    A wetland landscape in central North Dakota (left) and the associated network (right) created with a graph-theoretical approach. Circles represent nodes (i.e., centroids of wetlands) and lines represent links between nodes that have a distance less than a threshold value or disperse distance of 1000 m.

    A wetland landscape in central North Dakota (left) and the associated network (right) created with a graph-theoretical approach. Circles represent nodes (i.e., centroids of wetlands) and lines represent links between nodes that have a distance less than a threshold value or disperse distance of 1000 m.

    To apply the graph-theoretic approach to define wetland networks and to determine potential habitat connectivity across landscapes, the first and most essential step is to identify nodes on the landscapes, which requires spatially explicit information, e.g., X (longitude or UTM easting) and Y (latitude or UTM northing) values for wetland centroids. Satellite imagery has proven to be invaluable for this purpose by providing large-scale data-sets for monitoring the hydrologic character of wetlands and lakes and patterns of change. However, using these kinds of data come with certain limitations, for examples, the relatively short duration of observational records, their modest spatial resolutions, and the inability to provide direct quantitative information with respect to water transfers. Hydrologic models, such as HGS, can be used to leverage such satellite-based observations.

    This study applied the HGS to simulate the hydrologic dynamics of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) and to characterize the resulting habitat networks as a function of climate variability. Results show HGS was able to simulate water movement in both surface and subsurface domains and capture "fill-spill" and coalescence/disaggregation behaviors of wetlands as they responded to wet and dry climatic conditions. Our network analysis based on the HGS results illustrated broad differences in network connectivity, ranging from near total fragmentation of wetlands to strong ecological connectivity, as the climate varied from drought to deluge. In other words, wetland networks in the PPR could easily shrink, degrade, or even collapse when the climate becomes drier.

    To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first example where the results of the 3-D hydrologic modeling have been linked with graph theory to ascertain the effects of drought and deluge on ecological connectivity. This study obviously demonstrates the potential in applying the HGS model to solve critical ecological problems and the practical implications for water-resources management, conservation planning and decision-making in the PPR.

    The complete manuscript has been published by Wetlands.

    Citation: Liu, G., F. W. Schwartz, C. K. Wright, N. E. McIntyre (2016). Characterizing the climate-driven collapses and expansions of wetland habitats with a fully integrated surface–subsurface hydrologic model, Wetlands, doi:10.1007/s13157-016-0817-9